Archive for April 16th, 2020

What do Americans think about infertility and infertility insurance?

One in three American parents worry their children may suffer from infertility in the future*, according to a survey commissioned by LifeSpring Insurance Services and conducted online by The Harris Poll among over 2,000 U.S. adults age 18+. It asked Americans about their attitudes toward issues connected to growing a family and dealing with infertility. 

Infertility and American families

Primary infertility has caused more than a quarter of Americans/their families to seek treatment for it, and Americans are concerned about the impact and expense of treating infertility. A majority of parents say giving their children an opportunity to become parents is important: 78% of parents say it’s important to them that their children can have their own biological children one day.* 45% of parents of kids under 18 would be/would have been interested in a health insurance policy to protect their child(ren) or future children from future primary infertility.** 

Grandparenthood

Americans also place importance on becoming grandparents. Two-thirds of Americans (66%) say becoming a grandparent is an important milestone to them.  Adults ages 35-44 are more likely than their younger peers (age 18-34) and older peers (45+) to say becoming a grandparent is an important milestone to them (75% vs. 65% and 64%).  Women are more likely than men to say becoming a grandparent is an important milestone to them (69% vs. 63%). Only 30% percent of Americans think they will be seen differently or judged by their friends if they don’t have grandchildren someday, with men age 65+ more likely to feel this way than women 65+ (23% vs 11 %).**

Expense of infertility treatment

The LifeSpring infertility insurance policy is an answer to a familiar sentiment: that treating infertility costs too much.  

  • 86% of Americans say infertility treatments are too expensive for most Americans.* 
  • Most Americans think treatments should be affordable for anyone who needs it*  (84%), and women are more likely than men to feel this way (88% vs. 80%).* 

Optimism for future treatments

Americans are optimistic about future treatments for infertility. 

  • Over 7 in 10 Americans (71%) believe infertility may be cured by new medical treatments within the next 15 years.* 
  • Men age 45-54 are more likely than women age 45-54 to believe that infertility may be cured by new medical treatments within the next 15 years (79% vs. 66%).* 

Nearly 1 in 3 Americans (31%) would be/would have been interested in health insurance policy to protect their children or future children from future primary infertility.**  

What do you think?

Take our poll here.

Survey Methods: Two surveys were conducted online within the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of LifeSpring: *October 15 – 17, 2019 among 2,018 U.S. adults ages 18 and older among whom 1,172 are parents, and ** September 19-23, 2019 among 2,076 U.S. adults ages 18 and older among whom 819 are parents of children 18 and under. These online surveys are not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, contact info@momentum-pr.com.  

Infographic with survey on American attitudes toward starting a family, becoming grandparents, infertility, and infertility insurance